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IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE SUCCESSFUL SOLO EXHIBITION "DEARLY DEPARTED" AT THE BYTOWN MUSEUM, CARLETON UNIVERSITY MAGAZINE PUBLISHED AN ARTICLE ON THE WORK OF PMG ARTIST CINDY STELMACKOWICH WRITTEN BY PAUL GESSELL WITH IMAGES BY REMI THERIAULT. THE FOLLOWING IS AN EXCERPT FROM THE ARTICLE:

DARK ART

Art and science meet in the work of artist-academic Cindy Stelmackowich. Contrasts abound as she churns up beauty from the abject. The resulting works show that attraction and repulsion can coexist. A look inside the atelier with journalist Paul Gessell and photographer Rémi Thériault.

Cindy’s little shop of horrors is down a hall through a rabbit warren of artists’ studios in an old Ottawa bakery. The building—now called Enriched Bread Artists—is something of a laboratory for creative minds. Among them is an anatomically obsessed artist, properly titled Dr. Cindy Stelmackowich, during her day job as a contract instructor at Carleton University.

Just past the entrance to Stelmackowich’s studio there is, to the right, an assortment of human hair pieces called domes. Nearby is an old physician’s examining table that has surely been party to more indelicate secrets than a church confessional. Another wall displays rows of antique black mourning lace that fashion-conscious Victorian ladies used to adorn their widow’s weeds. Further into the room are photographic blows-ups of squirming little creatures known as cholera bacteria. The back wall reveals an image of a handsome young man, his eyes closed, his chest open, his organs tumbling into a ruby-red glass bowl below. Despite the gore, the man looks angelic, serene, even seductive. That’s a Stelmackowich trademark: conjuring beauty from unexpected places. Turns out, the little shop of horrors is actually a beauty shop.


To continue reading the article, please visit the Carleton University magazine Website at:
http://alumni.carleton.ca/2011/11/dark-art/